People


Andrew Ireson

andrew.ireson@usask.ca
Associate professor, SENS
Director of the MWS program
Vice-President of the Canadian Geophysical Union
Joint appointment CGE

Research Interests

  • Unsaturated flow and transport

  • Physics of frozen soils

  • Groundwater surface water interactions

  • Physically based modelling

See publications


Andrew Ireson

Seth Amankwah

seth.amankwah@usask.ca
SHyR group field technician


Seth maintains our field site at St Denis, SK, where we monitor soil moisture, frozen soils, evaporation fluxes, precipitation, groundwater levels, pond levels and chemistry. St Denis has been running since 1967, and has a long term, high quality record of hydrological change in the prairie pothole region. See an overview of the site here

Seth formerly completed an MES, looking at the role of solutes on the soil freezing characteristic curve. See his publication on this work here: Amankwah, S. K., Ireson, A. M., Maulé, C., Brannen, R., & Mathias, S. A. (2021) A Model for the Soil Freezing Characteristic Curve That Represents the Dominant Role of Salt Exclusion. Water Resources Research, 57(8), e2021WR030070 doi: 10.1029/2021WR030070


Seth Amankwah

Ines Sanchez Rodriguez

ics478@mail.usask.ca
PhD student: Modelling infiltration in frozen soils


PhD Research

Ines’ PhD focuses on quantifying the fate of snowmelt over frozen soils. Snowmelt is the dominant hydrological flux in many seasonally frozen areas, and at the time of melt, the soils remain frozen. The distribution of ice and liquid water in the soil pore space determines the infilitration capacity of the soils. Consequently, the same SWE can result in markedly different outcomes in any given year, depending on the state of the soil. When soils are wet and frozen, large amounts of runoff can be generating, sometimes resulting in floods. When soils are dry and frozen, water can infiltrate into air-filled pores, and most snowmelt infiltrates, recharging the soils and groundwater. Ines is exploring field observations and testing numerical models to improve our understanding of these processes.


Ines Sanchez Rodriguez

Mennatullah Elrashidy

menna.elrashidy@usask.ca
PhD student: Modelling groundwater-surface water interactions


Education:

  • Currently: PhD student, Civil Engineering, University of Saskatchewan.
  • Master of science in Irrigation and Hydraulic Engineering, Cairo University (June 2017).
  • Bachelor of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University (May 2012).

Research Interest:

  • Improving the representation of groundwater-surface water interactions in Land Surface Schemes (LSS) in boreal forests.
  • Representation of wetlands’ hydrological processes in large scale models.

Mennatullah Elrashidy

Morgan Braaten

morgan.braaten@usask.ca
MES student: Quantifying soil moisture using geolysimeters


MES Research

Geological weighing lysimeters (GWL) provide a means to quantify the total water storage change at scales of the order 1000-10000m2, by measuring the changes in mechanical loading within an aquitard or confined aquifer. Morgan’s research combines observations from a GWL with shallow soil moisture, snow water equivalent and the shallow water table, to partition total storage into components of shallow groundwater, soil moisture, surface water and snow. Morgan is applying the MESH and SUMMA models to reproduce field observations.


Morgan Braaten

Ayden Draude

amd932@mail.usask.ca
MES student: Soil-wetland salinization in the prairies


MES Research

Ayden’s MES research focuses on understanding the drivers of soil and wetland salinization in the Canadian prairies. His field site is St Denis SK, where he is monitoring pond and soil salinity. He will develop coupled flow and solute transport models to predict how changes in climating drivers, changes in the water table and changes in land use may impact salinization.


Ayden Draude

Alana Muenchrath

alana.muenchrath@gmail.com
PhD student: Modelling permafrost thaw


PhD Research

Alana’s PhD research is based at Baker Creek, located on treaty 11 territory, and focuses on quantfying hydrological processes associated with thawing permafrost, using combined field observations and mdoelling. Under a warming climate, as permafrost thaws, the subsurface flow pathways are expected to change. Thawing will lead to thickening of the active layer, the expansion of taliks and enhanced groundwater discharge and export of dissolved carbon from uplands into wetlands and streams.


Alana Muenchrath